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Portola Valley 2014 Planning Retreat – Parts 1, 2 and 3.

Parts 1, 2 and 3 – Background and Legal Issues

This is a video of Portola Valley Planning Retreat held at the Town Center May 18, 2014.  It contains the general background information about history of the General Plan and its implementation along with legal issues and responsibilities.

The stated objectives of the retreat were to review land use planning and the framework for planning decision making in Portola Valley with a critical eye to the future

This video is over an hour long and includes Steve Toben’s remarks, “Relic or Blueprint” (also included as a separate 14 minute video on this blog), Planners George Mader, Tom Vlasic and Ted Hayden’s remarks (starts at 14.13 minutes) along with those of Town Attorney, Leigh Prince.(starts at 49.54 minutes).

This was a public meeting with Town Council, Planning Commission and ASCC in attendance  along with members of the general public.

Celebrating Portola Valley’s 50th Anniversary, April 3, 2014

The Sequoias Retirement Community became the setting for the April 3, 2014 celebration for 50 year residents.

It was a grand gathering with lots of comradery as residents shared their remembrances.

This was a multigenerational event.  The children of many early residents who still live in Portola Valley share values of the earlier times.

_DSC4082_PV50th Group
Portola Valley Fifty Year Residents gathering at the Sequoias on April 3, 2014

Mayor Ann Wengert welcomes the crowd at the Sequoias, April 3, 2014Mayor Ann Wengert welcomes the crowd at the Sequoias, April 3, 2014

Former Council Member Sue Crane greets visitors, April 3, 2014
Former Council Member Sue Crane greets visitors, April 3, 2014
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 Nancy Lund, Ann Wengert, Cindie White and Danna Breen, April 3, 2014
Ellen and Bob Mosley, 60 year Portola Valley residents, April 3, 2014
Ellen and Bob Mosley, 60 year Portola Valley residents, April 3, 2014
Dianne Shilling and Mimi Breiner, April 3, 2014
Dianne Shilling and Mimi Breiner, April 3, 2014
Marilyn Walter and Ad Jessup, April 3, 2014
Marilyn Walter and Ad Jessup, April 3, 2014
Jean Lane, April 3, 2014
Jean Lane, April 3, 2014
John and Ellie Garner, April 3, 2014
John and Ellie Garner, April 3, 2014
Ron Ramies gives Carlo Besio a big hug as Nina Else looks one, April 3, 2014
Ron Ramies gives Carlo Besio a big hug as Nina Else looks on, April 3, 2014

Ed Wells and Cindie White share memories, April 3, 2014Ed Wells and Cindie White share memories, April 3, 2014

Sylvia McCrory still beautiful after 96 years will a smile that would warm anyone's heart.  April 3, 2014
Sylvia McCrory still beautiful after 96 years with a smile that would warm anyone’s heart,  April 3, 2014

 

 

 

The Incorporation Of Portola Valley – Part 2

August 14, 1945.Thirty million persons had died, but World War II was over, and the world began to revert slowly to normalcy. Boom time lay ahead. The war had had a powerful effect on San Mateo County. Thousands of workers had moved into the area to staff the military installations created in the war effort. Tens of thousands of members of the armed forced had passed through on the way to the Pacific theater. Many liked what they saw here and planned to return once the war ended. By 1950, more than 20,000 people a year were pouring into San Mateo County, looking for homes and jobs. The county population had increased by 110% between 1940 and 1950, and the 1950s saw another 89% increase. Subdivisions popped up everywhere. Assembly-line construction produced apartments, single-family dwellings and other necessary facilities at a rapid clip. The open land that once made San Mateo County the immense garden of San Francisco began to disappear. Eminent County Historian Frank Sanger summed up the situation in 1954: “Today the word most characteristic of the times is ‘subdivision.’ Divide and subdivide is the order of the day, driven on by the pressure of increased land values.” Little Portola Valley, a quiet hamlet of estates, small farms and summer cottages, wasn’t immune to the pressure. Two of the large landowners or their heirs put their properties on the market. In 1948, the Fitzhugh heirs sold their estate, Catoctin, today’s Grove and Stonegate neighborhoods, to the real estate firm of Cornish and Carey for 41 building sites that ranged in size from one to two and a half acres.

In 1946, Dent Macdonough sold the first portion of his Ormondale Ranch to a cooperative, the Peninsula Housing Association, that began the development of Ladera.     Old Ladera Brochure

Old Ladera Brochure

At first Macdonough was horrified at the thought of 400 houses rising on those 260 acres.

Dent Macdonough
Dent Macdonough

But he realized that civilization was closing in, and he was ready to move on. In 1947 he sold 209 acres to the Westridge Company, which eventually increased its holdings to 750 acres. Respecting the beauty of the land, these developers restricted lot size to 2 ½ acres. In 1955, Macdonough sold another 125 acres that became the Oak Hills development with two acre minimums.  Between 1957 and 1963, he sold the flat land around today’s Ormondale School, the heart of his immense ranch, thereby creating Arrowhead Meadows. These were very tempting properties to young families. Although many buyers and their friends thought Portola Valley was too far out in the country, prices were less than those in Palo Alto. And the land was beautiful. 

A look at the school population from 1944 to 1957, thirteen years, reveals how rapidly the young families were arriving:  1944: 24 students; 1949: 62; 1951: 149; 1953: 230; 1957: 464!

SCHM-087d PVSD 48, 57 smallThe two one-room schoolhouses weren’t sufficient for the young students. One was divided into two classrooms;  the other was dismantled to make room for Portola Valley School which was built in sections in the 1950s but not fast enough to accommodate the increasing enrollment.

 For a time kindergarteners met at Our Lady of the Wayside. Some classes went into double sessions.  Fruit picker shacks and dormitories were revamped for classrooms. The superintendent held parent conferences in his car.

SCHM-091d PVSD Bond DrThe band practiced in the redwood grove.  During one election, a class was held in the school bus because the room was needed for the voters.

Classes held in School Bus
Classes held in School Bus

Thanks to regular bond issues, Corte Madera opened in 1958, the last wings of PVS were finished in 1959, and Ormondale was ready in 1961.

At last every child has a regular classroom, but growth was predicted to continue.  In 1956 a survey conducted by the San Mateo County School Board and Stanford’s School of Education predicted that the population would double from 2800 within 5 years, eventually reaching 2637 to 4000 families with a school population that would reach 1900.  In 1959 the county planning commission projected a population of 17,000 by 1990.  It was not only families that were tempted by the open spaces in Portola Valley.

California Cabana Clubs planned a country club at Portola and Westridge with a 9-hole golf course among other sporting amenities, just one of three such plans being proposed.

Proposed Arrowhead Country Club
Proposed Arrowhead Country Club

“Mama” Garcia, proprietor of the popular restaurant bearing her name, applied to open a rest home.  A 75-bed hospital at Nathhorst was in the works as was a convalescent hospital on Hillbrook. Apartments were being considered. Thoughts of a new state college on the Bovet property arose.  Multiple plans were broached for extending Willow Road [now called Sand Hill] along Alpine Road which would become a four lane parkway astride Los Trancos Creek. It could then extend over Coal Mine Ridge to connect with Page Mill Road. Or Willowbrook could become that extension. It gradually became apparent to the new residents that the ambiance of their new hometown could change drastically. They loved the quiet rural quality, the wildlife, the views, the pleasure of riding horses over open space. They worried about decisions that the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors or Planning Commission might make for their little corner at the very southern tip of the county, so far away from the seat of government. Realizing that the post-war boom was reaching the valley, on January 13, 1955, a group of 75 residents met at Portola School to discuss how to protect the character of the area, to defend it against intensive development, the population boom and urbanization. This group, originally led by Robert Paul, Ray Garrasino, Tony Rose and Jeffrey Smith eventually became the Portola Valley Association. The drive for incorporation had begun.

by Nancy Lund, February 7, 2014

The Incorporation of Portola Valley – Part 1

 

Portola Valley's 50th Anniversarty
Portola Valley’s 50th Anniversary

For most of the first half of the twentieth century, Portola Valley (or Portola as it was first known) was a sleepy little place at the end of the road. A few immigrants from many countries operated small farms.  Los Trancos Woods, Woodside Highlands and Brookside were neighborhoods of small cottages to which San Franciscans of humble means came in the summer to escape the cold, dreary fogs of the city. For the most part, there was no heat and only rudimentary water systems. Phone service was late in coming. But it was peaceful and beautiful. Most of the rest of the land was held in large parcels owned by individuals.

All this began to change, however, after World War II. The population of San Mateo County exploded as people began to arrive in huge numbers. Portola Valley began to grow so rapidly that residents worried about losing the rural qualities that they loved in their quiet little town. They began to talk about incorporation so that they could make decisions about local land use rather than relying on decisions by a distant county Board of Supervisors. Beginning in 1955, nine long years of study, discussion and debate were to pass before residents could make local decisions about local issues.

A quick survey of those large land owners and their lifestyles can help to explain the dynamics and the changes that would occur in those years immediately after the war when some of those owners began to sell their properties. Here’s how it was until the post war years.

A San Francisco hardware merchant, Stephen Mariani, owned the Mariani Ranch, known as Blue Oaks today, for most of the twentieth century. The little brown house still standing by the neighborhood swimming pool was their summer place.  A barrel of sturdy sticks stood by the front door; the Mariani children would take one when they went out to play for protection against rattlesnakes.

Portola Valley Ranch was known as the Bovet place.  Anthony Bovet was a nephew of Antone Borel, a wealthy banker of some local fame, for whom Anthony worked. But he really wanted to be a cattle rancher, so he kept a herd on his ranch in Portola Valley.

The Bovets in their garden
The Bovets in their garden

The Bovets brought several fine pieces from the Borel mansion in San Mateo to furnish their house. Their house still stands although it can’t be seen from any public roadway.

The eighty acres between Portola Valley Ranch and Los Trancos and Alpine roads have been in the hands of only two families since rancho times.  In the 1880s, Judge James Allen and his family bought eighty acres from Antonio Martinez, son of the ranchero.

Allen-Woods Home
Allen-Woods Home

The Woods family purchased the property in 1915; members of the family occupied the 1885 main house off Los Trancos Road and a 1950s house above Roberts Market until 2008 when Fred Woods III bequeathed the land to POST, the private land trust.

For some seventy years, the hills that give Alpine Hills its subdivision name were the possession of Mary Ann Stanton, as was the building we call today Alpine Inn (or affectionately, Rosotti’s or “Zot’s.)Aline Inn

Alpine Inn, a sketch by local artist Jean Groberg

 


A widow, whose young husband died in a tragic buggy/train accident on Christmas Eve, 1887, she lived in Menlo Park and hired genial barkeepers to run her roadhouse establishment. She leased the hills for cattle.

Mary Serres Stanton
Mary Serres Stanton

The vast Ormondale Ranch, home to Ormonde, the most famous race horse of the nineteenth century (and his less illustrious son Ormondale,) occupied today’s subdivisions of Westridge, Oak Hills and Ladera. The Macdonough family, first Joseph and then Dent, had as many as two hundred horses and several barns. Horses eventually gave way to sheep, tended by a Basque shepherd.

William and Mary Fitzhugh, San Franciscans, kept a rustic vacation place on what we call Grove Drive, Grove Court and Stonegate Road. Their two main houses, which still stand, were once connected by a structure used as a dormitory for guests.

William Fitzhugh
William Fitzhugh

They also had colorful tents on platforms for overflow company.  The area around Tintern was their farm. Strawberries, tended by Chinese workers, was a big crop.

The Morshead family owned El Mirador Farm, first home to Andrew Hallidie of cable car fame, for most of the twentieth century. Rising to the west (actually the south) above Portola Road, it is still in private hands. In the Morshead days, the first town picnics were held there, and children enjoyed the lakes and the model train on which they could ride. When Stanley Morshead rang the bell on non-picnic days, children knew it was in invitation to come and ride.

The most famous of these large landowners was John Francis Neylan.

John Francis Neylan
John Francis Neylan

The lawyer for William Randolph Hearst, twenty-eight year member of the University of California Board of Regents, State Controller, he owned 1500 acres in the hills that form the backdrop of the town. In 1937, he had acquired the property from Herbert Law for $255,000. Earlier in the century, Law had amassed the estate, buying from small farmers in order to control the waters of Corte Madera Creek so that he could have sufficient water for his herb farm that extended along today’s Willowbrook Drive.

Neylan was an ardent and vociferous foe of the incorporation talk that began in the mid 1950s. And yet, it was a decision of his that made him responsible more than any other single person for the incorporation for the Town of Portola Valley.
By Nancy Lund, January 2014

Marion Softky – Environmentalist/ Almanac Reporter

Marion Softky was a trail blazing environmentalist.  She was also an excellent writer who crafted her skills as a News Reporter for the Country Almanac.  She covered San Mateo County  particularly the communities in the southern part.

Marion Sofsky
Marion Softsky, November 24, 2011.

Marion had unique insights into land planning and development in Portola Valley and San Mateo County.

She carefully selected information she had collected over the years.   We were fortunate she shared it with us just 6 weeks before she died.  Her legacy is that she has provided us unique insights into more than 50 years of our history.

You’ll find her work documented in this lengthy video.