Tag Archives: Nancy Lund

Portola Valley Celebrates its 50th Anniversary

Sunday, September 21, 2014 was the culmination of a year of planning for the celebration of the 50th Anniversary of Portola Valley’s incorporation as a town.   The ad-hoc 50th Celebration Committee was headed by Cindie White and Danna Breen, who made this dream become a reality, along with many volunteers, Town Manager, Nick Pegueros, and Town staff.

Danna Breen and Cindie White
Danna Breen and Cindie White

The day started in an InterFaith Service at the Town Center and included the simultaneous ringing of bells.

Interfaith Service at Town Center included the simultaneous ringing of  bells from all the churches in Town.
Interfaith Service at Town Center included the simultaneous ringing of bells from all the churches in Town.

The Town invited residents to a BBQ and lots of events through out the day including gathering materials for a new time capsule.

50th Anniversary Celebration photo by Paige Bishop
50th Anniversary Celebration photo by Paige Bishop

There was an informative panel presentation moderated by Nancy Lund. It gave residents an overview of how the Town was formed and where its values came from.  Speakers included Sam Haltsed, George Mader, Sue Crane, Bill Cotton, Tom Vlasic and Alex VonFelt. Jon Silver also spoke eloquently from the audience describing Portola Valley as a “Garden of Eden” for democracy.

You can see the presentation here:

Nancy Bovee, Laure Woods and Steve Dunne performed a new Portola Valley song which they composed for the 50th Anniversary gathering.

What a great way to celebrate Portola Valley, the place we all call home.

The Incorporation of Portola Valley – Part 1

 

Portola Valley's 50th Anniversarty
Portola Valley’s 50th Anniversary

For most of the first half of the twentieth century, Portola Valley (or Portola as it was first known) was a sleepy little place at the end of the road. A few immigrants from many countries operated small farms.  Los Trancos Woods, Woodside Highlands and Brookside were neighborhoods of small cottages to which San Franciscans of humble means came in the summer to escape the cold, dreary fogs of the city. For the most part, there was no heat and only rudimentary water systems. Phone service was late in coming. But it was peaceful and beautiful. Most of the rest of the land was held in large parcels owned by individuals.

All this began to change, however, after World War II. The population of San Mateo County exploded as people began to arrive in huge numbers. Portola Valley began to grow so rapidly that residents worried about losing the rural qualities that they loved in their quiet little town. They began to talk about incorporation so that they could make decisions about local land use rather than relying on decisions by a distant county Board of Supervisors. Beginning in 1955, nine long years of study, discussion and debate were to pass before residents could make local decisions about local issues.

A quick survey of those large land owners and their lifestyles can help to explain the dynamics and the changes that would occur in those years immediately after the war when some of those owners began to sell their properties. Here’s how it was until the post war years.

A San Francisco hardware merchant, Stephen Mariani, owned the Mariani Ranch, known as Blue Oaks today, for most of the twentieth century. The little brown house still standing by the neighborhood swimming pool was their summer place.  A barrel of sturdy sticks stood by the front door; the Mariani children would take one when they went out to play for protection against rattlesnakes.

Portola Valley Ranch was known as the Bovet place.  Anthony Bovet was a nephew of Antone Borel, a wealthy banker of some local fame, for whom Anthony worked. But he really wanted to be a cattle rancher, so he kept a herd on his ranch in Portola Valley.

The Bovets in their garden
The Bovets in their garden

The Bovets brought several fine pieces from the Borel mansion in San Mateo to furnish their house. Their house still stands although it can’t be seen from any public roadway.

The eighty acres between Portola Valley Ranch and Los Trancos and Alpine roads have been in the hands of only two families since rancho times.  In the 1880s, Judge James Allen and his family bought eighty acres from Antonio Martinez, son of the ranchero.

Allen-Woods Home
Allen-Woods Home

The Woods family purchased the property in 1915; members of the family occupied the 1885 main house off Los Trancos Road and a 1950s house above Roberts Market until 2008 when Fred Woods III bequeathed the land to POST, the private land trust.

For some seventy years, the hills that give Alpine Hills its subdivision name were the possession of Mary Ann Stanton, as was the building we call today Alpine Inn (or affectionately, Rosotti’s or “Zot’s.)Aline Inn

Alpine Inn, a sketch by local artist Jean Groberg

 


A widow, whose young husband died in a tragic buggy/train accident on Christmas Eve, 1887, she lived in Menlo Park and hired genial barkeepers to run her roadhouse establishment. She leased the hills for cattle.

Mary Serres Stanton
Mary Serres Stanton

The vast Ormondale Ranch, home to Ormonde, the most famous race horse of the nineteenth century (and his less illustrious son Ormondale,) occupied today’s subdivisions of Westridge, Oak Hills and Ladera. The Macdonough family, first Joseph and then Dent, had as many as two hundred horses and several barns. Horses eventually gave way to sheep, tended by a Basque shepherd.

William and Mary Fitzhugh, San Franciscans, kept a rustic vacation place on what we call Grove Drive, Grove Court and Stonegate Road. Their two main houses, which still stand, were once connected by a structure used as a dormitory for guests.

William Fitzhugh
William Fitzhugh

They also had colorful tents on platforms for overflow company.  The area around Tintern was their farm. Strawberries, tended by Chinese workers, was a big crop.

The Morshead family owned El Mirador Farm, first home to Andrew Hallidie of cable car fame, for most of the twentieth century. Rising to the west (actually the south) above Portola Road, it is still in private hands. In the Morshead days, the first town picnics were held there, and children enjoyed the lakes and the model train on which they could ride. When Stanley Morshead rang the bell on non-picnic days, children knew it was in invitation to come and ride.

The most famous of these large landowners was John Francis Neylan.

John Francis Neylan
John Francis Neylan

The lawyer for William Randolph Hearst, twenty-eight year member of the University of California Board of Regents, State Controller, he owned 1500 acres in the hills that form the backdrop of the town. In 1937, he had acquired the property from Herbert Law for $255,000. Earlier in the century, Law had amassed the estate, buying from small farmers in order to control the waters of Corte Madera Creek so that he could have sufficient water for his herb farm that extended along today’s Willowbrook Drive.

Neylan was an ardent and vociferous foe of the incorporation talk that began in the mid 1950s. And yet, it was a decision of his that made him responsible more than any other single person for the incorporation for the Town of Portola Valley.
By Nancy Lund, January 2014

Contacts & Info

For more information, please contact us.

Nancy Lund, Portola Valley Town Historian, Educator and Author, and I embarked on a project several years ago to learn more about the roots of the Town of Portola Valley, California.

Nancy brought her knowledge of the Town’s history and interview skills and I, my technical and creative talents. Together we forged an alliance and captured video histories of many of Portola Valley’s earliest residents.

Our initial work was to find out about the people who helped incorporate the Town of Portola Valley, California in 1964.  We wanted to learn what the forces were that helped to create the Town and the challenges our early residents faced.

Here we hope to share with you some of what we have learned. Nancy LundYou can reach Nancy Lund at nlund@yahoo.com

Virginia BaconVirginia Bacon is a  licensed CA Real Estate Broker, #00883531
You can reach Virginia Bacon at vcbacon@beaucamera.com or at vcbacon@beauhomes.com